Review: Lock Every Door by Riley Sager

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Title: Lock Every Door
Author: Riley Sager
Genre: Mystery/Thriller
Publisher: Dutton
Source: Book of the Month
Release Date: July 2nd, 2019
Rating: ★★★


No visitors. No nights spent away from the apartment. No disturbing the other residents, all of whom are rich or famous or both. These are the only rules for Jules Larsen’s new job as an apartment sitter at the Bartholomew, one of Manhattan’s most high-profile and mysterious buildings. Recently heartbroken and just plain broke, Jules is taken in by the splendor of her surroundings and accepts the terms, ready to leave her past life behind.

As she gets to know the residents and staff of the Bartholomew, Jules finds herself drawn to fellow apartment sitter Ingrid, who comfortingly, disturbingly reminds her of the sister she lost eight years ago. When Ingrid confides that the Bartholomew is not what it seems and the dark history hidden beneath its gleaming facade is starting to frighten her, Jules brushes it off as a harmless ghost story . . . until the next day, when Ingrid disappears.

Searching for the truth about Ingrid’s disappearance, Jules digs deeper into the Bartholomew’s dark past and into the secrets kept within its walls. Her discovery that Ingrid is not the first apartment sitter to go missing at the Bartholomew pits Jules against the clock as she races to unmask a killer, expose the building’s hidden past, and escape the Bartholomew before her temporary status becomes permanent.


2019 is killing it with the summer thrillers! I had high expectations for this book after reading The Last Time I Lied by Riley Sager, which came out last July. Not only did this book deliver, I thought it was even better.

Overview: After her tragic childhood, the loss of her job, and the discovery of her boyfriend’s infidelity, 25-year-old Jules is barely scraping by in New York City. Crashing on her friend’s couch and struggling to land a job, she responds to a mysterious apartment-sitting ad. What initially seems like an offer too good to be turned down quickly turns into a nightmare as Jules unravels the dark secrets of the Bartholomew and the rich-and-famous people who reside there.

Characters:

➽ Jules: A desperate, timid young woman who lacks in self-confidence, but makes up for it with grit and determination.

➽ Leslie: The building manager with far too many mysterious rules.

➽ Ingrid: A fellow apartment sitter whose disappearance sets Jules into action.

➽ Nick: A mysterious doctor and long-time resident of the Bartholomew who lives across the hall.

➽ Greta: An unfriendly Bartholomew resident who wrote a best-selling book about the famous building.

Plot: I can’t remember the last time a book pulled me along like this one did. I flew through the pages, constantly needing to know what happens next! The entire story is a fun and utterly terrifying thrill ride that sucked me in from beginning to end. Despite this, there’s a certain amount of disbelief that has to be suspended in order for this book to be truly enjoyable. The mystery is intriguing, and had me constantly guessing at everyone’s true motives. The plot twist at the end wasn’t as shocking to me as it was for some other readers, but the fact that I saw it coming makes it far more believable (after all, there’s nothing worse than a plot twist that catches you off guard, but makes no sense at all).

Which leads me to:

The Ending: The suspense gradually builds to a climactic ending that I’ll be thinking about for awhile. A lot of thriller novels end in disappointment, but this one ends spectacularly!

If you’re looking for a nail-biting summer thriller, look no further! This book will keep you up all night flipping pages.

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